Webcam – 502 Gateway Error

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Some times the Webcams are experiencing 502 Gateway Errors. Some people can see the webcams and some people can’t. Sorry about that. If you experience a 502 Gateway Error, try reloading the page again later. Some folks who reported seeing the error later said they could see the webcams.

Here are stills of the video feeds from 2017-09-09 at 9:47 a.m.

Dewees Webcam Still Images

Tropical Storm Ana keeps hanging around…

Posted on 2 CommentsPosted in Island Living, Spring

IMG_9355There is a storm (Tropical Storm Ana) sitting off the Carolina coast right now, and it’s actually creating some gorgeous weather conditions.  It’s also causing the ferry to sit out an occasional run, which provides island residents with either an extra hour to watch the beautiful weather from the island, or a chance to hang out at Morgan Creek Grill and grab a snack and beverage with your friends.  “Tropical Bands of Moisture” have been wandering across the island (although there has been no precipitation today) with some pretty intense downpours, and the pattern is set to continue through tomorrow evening. So, since we know here that we have friends from across the country that have been watching the national weather and wondering, we’re sending some photos to update you on the weather conditions today.

from Storm Team 2

Dewees Island, with Charleston County, is now under a Tropical Storm Watch, while areas to our north, starting at the South Santee river, are under a tropical storm warning.

Truly, it’s gusty on the beach. Forecasters have been saying all along that the biggest threat from this storm to the Charleston Metro area will be mostly in the form of rip currents and beach erosion. This post from 2010 has a lot of information on rip currents. As for beach erosion, we are really thankful that Dewees Island has the setbacks it does: they are often 3x what they are on neighboring islands. So while Isle of Palms is bracing with sandbags:

IOP beach in the Post and Courier this morning: photo by Anne Chandler

(click here for the whole story), the Dewees beach (which has actually grown significantly since Irene blew by in 2010) looks like this:IMG_9332
And elsewhere on the island, the combination of moisture rich tropical clouds and intermittent sunshine has provided us with some lovely views:
The impoundment
Sand blowing on the front beach
IMG_9334
Huyler House pond
view from the bird blind
IMG_9363
IMG_9357

Arla on YouTube

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Former Dewees Naturalist Arla Slaughter made the best of a not so great vacation in St. Lucia. She and her camera man reported on Hurricane Tomas in St. Lucia. The footage or Arla is now available on YouTube.

Look out Jim Cantore, Arla just might want your job at the Weather Channel.

Hurricane Cookies for Sale Labor Day Weekend

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Harriet McLeod’s (Go Away) Hurricane Cookies will be available for sale at the Labor Day Barbecue.  When we first moved to the lowcountry, our MOST favorite Post and Courier column was on page B1 of the newspaper:  Good Morning Lowcountry.  There was no byline, just GMLC.  It was an awesome column– full of information for locals, and especially helpful for newcomers.

It was the first thing I read in each morning paper.  I learned how to pronounce the name of the Cooper River, Vanderhorst Street, and Huger.  I learned where to do neat things (especially free things) and how to behave at an oyster roast. And the day I read about the author baking annual Go Away Hurricane Cookies, I thought, “I have got to meet this writer!”  Anybody who bakes in the face of an impending storm and credits those cookies with changing the course of storms is awesome in my book.

Little did I know, I had already met the author.  Harriet McLeod is a Dewees regular, and I was delighted to find that sending an email to GMLC from the newspaper’s website resulted in an address for Harriet!  In fact, the tradition began with a hurricane evacuation of Dewees! Here is the background:

The cookies have their provenance on Dewees. Harriet started baking them for the boat captains in 1996 while helping button up the McLeod house for hurricane warnings and evacuations.  She noticed that every time she baked them the approaching hurricane would veer off and avoid the Lowcountry coast. Since then, she’s made the cookies in advance of every Lowcountry storm watch or warning, and each time the storm went somewhere else. Except once. The back side of Hurricane Floyd smacked us in 1999 while Harriet was vacationing in Maine and unable to make the cookies!
(Go Away) Hurricane Cookies are a scrumptious and messy (like a hurricane) mix of chocolate, caramel and pecan with a secret ingredient that serves as powerful gris-gris against hurricanes. This season, we need them more than ever to send storms away from Dewees and the Lowcountry and back out to sea.
Go Away Hurricane Cookies
Gourmet caramel, pecan, chocolate chunk cookies. Messy, like a hurricane.

Powerful gris-gris against tropical storms*
*With secret ingredient guaranteed to make hurricanes go away
Order by the dozen at hurricanecookies@gmail.com.


$15/dozen

Copyright 2010/harrietmcleod

So bring your money and take home a few cookies this weekend.  It looks like Harriet is taking pre-orders, and we’ll be getting some for ourselves.  And those awesome GMLC columns… well, we’re hoping that they are available sometime for everyone to read!


Activity in the Tropics Means Rip Current Risks

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There’s a long string of swirly storms on the latest satellite images.  We recommend watching carefully and taking the necessary precautions, including obtaining  stickers for re-entry to the Isle of Palms at City Hall.  (We are heading over there tomorrow after realizing that ours has expired.)  AND, we hear a rumor that there will be anti-hurricane cookies on sale this weekend.  While we investigate those two things, we have noticed that there is an increased danger of rip currents because of the way the storms affect the shoreline.  Below are some links about rip currents and a brochure published by NOAA at USA.gov.  Redistribution is encouraged. On Dewees, rip currents are probably most likely around the sandbars and at the inlets.

Today’s  surf zone forecast for Charleston says:

CHARLESTON-
INCLUDING THE BEACHES OF...CAPE ROMAIN...ISLE OF PALMS...
SULLIVANS ISLAND...FOLLY BEACH...KIAWAH ISLAND
338 AM EDT SUN AUG 29 2010
...HIGH RISK FOR RIP CURRENTS...
RIP CURRENT OUTLOOK...FOR TODAY.
HIGH RISK. WIND AND OR WAVE CONDITIONS SUPPORT DANGEROUS RIP
CURRENTS. NO ONE SHOULD ENTER THE SURF DUE TO THIS LIFE THREATENING
HAZARD. RIP CURRENTS ARE POWERFUL CHANNELS OF WATER FLOWING QUICKLY
AWAY FROM SHORE...WHICH OCCUR MOST OFTEN AT LOW SPOTS OR BREAKS IN
THE SANDBAR AND IN THE VICINITY OF STRUCTURES SUCH AS GROINS...
JETTIES AND PIERS. HEED THE ADVICE OF LIFEGUARDS AND THE BEACH
PATROL. PAY ATTENTION TO FLAGS AND POSTED SIGNS.
TODAY...PARTLY CLOUDY. HIGHS IN THE MID 80S. EAST WINDS 15 TO
20 MPH.
MONDAY...PARTLY CLOUDY. HIGHS IN THE MID 80S. EAST WINDS 10 TO
20 MPH.
SEA WATER TEMPERATURES ARE IN THE MID 80S.

A cool graphic about how to predict weather

More signs you can download and print

An article about rip currents at How Stuff Works

The National Hurricane Center

Photos of Snow on Dewees

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Special Thanks to Ann and Jim Anderson for the photos of snow on Dewees.  If you have any more, please share them with us.

Click here to see photos of snow on Dewees.

It snowed on Dewees

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It snowed more than an inch on Dewees overnight. If you have photos, please send them to us so we can post them here. Thanks.

Other places in Charleston got 4 or 5 inches.

Ferry Crew Grins through the COLD

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The temperatures in Charleston have fallen to near record lows and are expected to stay low for 2 weeks. That’s any unusually long and deep cold snap for the area. So we got quite a laugh when the current weather conditions board on the ferry read “85 – Sunny” this morning.

Waterspot over Isle of Palms this Morning

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The 7:30 ferry ride was quite eventful.

When we arrived at the dock, two huge cracks of thunder over the front beach convinced us to ride the ferry instead taking our own powerboat.

Captain Al Kemp pointed out that there were 7 Roseatte Spoonbills just over the oyster shell berm on the Mount Pleasant side (North side) of the Intracoast Waterway about 300 yards before you reach the no wake bouys.  We started to run upstairs to get a better view.

Before reached the top dock, the loudspeaker boomed with Captain Al’s voice, “Reggie, there’s a waterspout just off the port bow!  See it?”  I was still thinking about the Spoonbills and had a hard time shifting my focus.  When I did, this is what I saw:

Notice the waterspout in the center of the photo.  The waterspout was over the IOP or its front beach.
Notice the waterspout in the center of the photo. The waterspout was over the IOP or its front beach.

We could see the bottom of the funnel clouds swirling.  Fortunately, the waterspout dissipated while we watched.

Late Spring on Dewees

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We’re on Dewees for the weekend, frolicking in the late spring / earely summer weather.  So are the critters.  The rosette spoonbill is back.  She looks gloriously pink on Mother’s Day.  We’ve seen her several times near the corner of Old House Lane and Dewees Inlet Drive where the shorebirds hang out.

The snakes are out.  We’ve seen baby water moccasins and large black racers.  The first is poisonous, the second isn’t.

We’ve seen two black-necked stilts in the impoundment.  They look both beautiful and funny when they fly with their legs held straight behind them. They must have amazing abs to hold them that way.